Authors:
Emily Schifter, Associate, Troutman Sanders
Richard Gerakitis, Partner, Troutman Sanders
Tracey Diamond, Of Counsel, Pepper Hamilton
Rogers Stevens, Associate, Pepper Hamilton
Lee Tankle, Associate, Pepper Hamilton
Susan Lessack, Partner, Pepper Hamilton

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act), signed into law on March 27, provides

During this time of emergency, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has provided guidance for employers on how to complete the I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification form, which requires employers to inspect the original documents provided in person by employees. If there are individuals who wish to limit social interactions with others and do not want

Authors:
Lee Tankle, Associate, Pepper Hamilton
Moses Tincher, Associate, Troutman Sanders
Tracey Diamond, Of Counsel, Pepper Hamilton
Susan Lessak, Partner, Pepper Hamilton

On March 18, President Trump signed into law the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the Act). The Act addresses many issues related to the nation’s response to COVID-19, including

AUTHORS
Ashley Hager, Partner, Troutman Sanders
Seth Ford, Partner, Troutman Sanders
Emily Reber, Associate, Troutman Sanders
Tracey Diamond, Of Counsel, Pepper Hamilton

We are continuing our series of guidance on the new issues facing employers during the COVID-19 outbreak. In our last post, Coronavirus and OSHA: What Employers Need to Know

For two months, an outbreak of a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has been spreading rapidly across the world. Is your company prepared to handle the issues that will arise if the virus spreads to your community or even becomes a pandemic? In this presentation, Ashley Hager will discuss tips for managing your workforce in light of

At the end of last year, we reported that a federal district court had imposed a last-minute temporary restraining order to block California from enforcing its new law (AB 51), which would have imposed criminal penalties on California employers that use mandatory arbitration agreements. That court has now issued a preliminary injunction that continues to

Beginning January 1, 2020, California law (known as AB 51) makes it a criminal misdemeanor for employers to require arbitration as a condition of employment. The law specifically prohibits mandatory arbitration of claims under the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (such as for discrimination, harassment, and retaliation) and claims for violations of the California