In a 2-1 ruling on February 4, 2019, the Second Appellate District of the California Court of Appeals expanded requirements for reporting time pay by ruling that a California employer would owe reporting time pay if it requires an employee to call in to confirm a scheduled on-call shift, even when the employee does not

Worksite Enforcement

When you think of immigration in the United States these days, the first thought that comes to your mind might be the continuing dispute over building a wall at the Southern border.  That topic has certainly received the most attention, but for employers, the more relevant issue remains the increasing worksite immigration enforcement

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner, what better way to celebrate than to examine the pitfalls of office romances? The “Me Too” era is still in full swing, and it is subjecting employers to more scrutiny than ever. Have you considered how to best handle office romances between employees before Cupid’s arrow meets its

As we covered last year, the United States Supreme Court held in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis that employment contracts can legally bar employees from collective arbitration (and require instead individualized proceedings). The Supreme Court found that a provision forbidding collective arbitration violated neither the Federal Arbitration Act nor the National Labor Relations Act. This

Perhaps before the year-end holidays kicked in, you might have noticed that on Friday, December 14, 2018, a Texas judge struck down the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) as unconstitutional in its entirety.  The judge held that since 2017’s tax bill effectively eliminated the penalty for violations of the ACA’s individual mandate that required most Americans

Do you monitor your employees using technology?  Would you consider making them wear wristbands or other devices capturing their every move?

This spring, news spread that Amazon had been granted two patents for a new wristband that appeared to be designed to do just that for its warehouse and fulfillment staff.  The patents indicated that

The Bloomberg Editorial Board recently published an article entitled “Too Many Workers Are Trapped By Non-Competes” arguing that the practice of requiring relatively low-wage and/or unskilled workers to sign non-compete agreements is a drag on the economy and is contributing to wage stagnation. The article contends that restricting unspecialized workers’ ability to freely change jobs

The National Labor Relations Board is signaling yet another change to the joint employer test in its recent issuance of a new proposed rule.  The Board has waffled back and forth on this important issue recently, creating a lot of uncertainty for employers.  Here’s an explanation of what has been going on and what is

Employers are well aware of the requirement to post various notices from the EEOC, DOL, and other acronym-bearing state and federal agencies.  Unfortunately, many employers have a “post it and forget it” mentality and fail to regularly update those posters and required notices.

These agencies, however, are often issuing updated required postings and employers who

A recent ruling by the California Supreme Court could have lasting consequences for timekeeping practices and the payment of wages for hourly employees. In the case of Troester v. Starbucks Corp., the court ruled on July 26, 2018 that Starbucks had to pay the plaintiff for time spent on regular, off-the-clock tasks. The court